Frequently Asked Questions

Driving License

If you are a resident of Ontario, you need an Ontario driver’s license in order to drive. The process to get a driver’s license depends on if you are a new driver, or if you have had a driver’s license before.
If you have an International Driver’s Permit (IDP), you can use this when you first arrive in Canada. The IDP is a translation of your driver’s license from another country and is valid for 1 year.
You must apply for an IDP outside of Canada. IDPs issued in Canada are not valid in Canada.
The IDP is primarily used by visitors to Ontario. If you plan on living in Ontario, you need to get an Ontario driver’s license within 60 days of moving to Ontario.

  • Ontario has 2 main different licenses depending on which kind of vehicle you want to drive.
  • G class (includes G1 and G2) – For cars, vans and small trucks
  • M class (includes M1 and M2) – For motorcycles, motor scooters and mopeds

To get a driver’s license in Ontario, you must be 16 years old or older. You must pass a vision test to show that you can see well enough to drive safely.

You have to go to a Driver Examination Centre to apply for a license and you need to bring:

Proof of name

Proof of your age / date of birth

A document with your signature

You have to pay a fee to apply. See more information about how to apply for a driver’s license.

Find more information about how to get a driver’s license in these cases:

If you have a driver’s license from another country, you may be able to exchange it for an Ontario driver’s license. The type of license you can get depends on how much driving experience you have and if the country has a reciprocal agreement with Ontario. In some cases, you may have to go through the graduated licensing system.

Some countries, like the United States, Australia, France and Korea, have a license exchange agreement with Ontario which allows licensed drivers to obtain an Ontario license without having to go through the regular process for obtaining a license in this province. Read about the license Exchange program on the DriveTest website

If your license is from a country that is not in the list above, you must present official, written confirmation of your driving experience. Written confirmation is an original letter from the original licensing agency (such as the ministry of transportation in your country or state).

The letter must be:

 

Written on official letterhead

Written in one of official languages English or French – If it is written in another language, you must submit a letter of translation from a qualified translator.

Dated – It cannot be more than 6 months old.

This letter must include information about:

The date first licensed

license expiry date

Class of license

That the license was valid for the relevant period of time for the purposes of exchange and experience

If you are a new driver or have less than 12 months of driving experience, you must take a knowledge test first (Level 1 of graduated licensing) G1 holders may drive Class G vehicles when accompanied by a fully licensed driver with at least four years of driving experience. You have to get 12 months of driving experience before you can take the G1 road test.

If you have 12-24 months of driving experience, you can take the G1 road test immediately after your knowledge test. If you pass this test, you get a G2 license.

To prove your driving experience, you must get written confirmation of your foreign driving experience.

If the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) recognizes your driving experience, you can use this time towards the 12-month waiting period for the G2 road test.

If you have 24 months of driving experience, you can take the G1 or G2 road test immediately. If you pass, you will get the next license in the graduated licensing system. For example, if you pass the G1 test, you will get a G2 license. If you pass the G2 test, you will get a G license. The G license is a full driver’s license.

You must get written confirmation of your foreign driving experience.

For more information about Drivers licenses for cars, vans, small trucks you may visit DriveTest website

For other types of licenses for motorcycle and commercial vehicles please visit www.drivetest.ca/

If you are a visitor (tourist) in Ontario and wish to drive, you can do so for up to 90 days with a valid driver’s license from your own country, state or province.
You will also need:

To be at least 16 years old

Proper insurance coverage for the vehicle you will drive

The original (or exact) copy of the vehicle ownership permit to carry with you while driving

Bank Account

To open a bank account, you need to book an appointment and go to the bank in person with complete acceptable identification.

For acceptable form of IDs you may choose any of the following 3 choices:

  • Show 2 pieces of ID from List A; or
  • Show 1 piece of ID from List A and 1 piece from List B; or
  • Show 1 piece of ID from List A and have someone, who the bank knows, confirm that you are who you say you are.

 

List A

A drivers’ licence issued in Canada;

A Canadian passport;

A Certificate of Canadian Citizenship or Certification of Naturalization;

A Permanent Resident Card;

A birth certificate issued in Canada;

A Social Insurance Number (SIN) card issued by the Government of Canada;

An Old Age Security card issued by the Government of Canada;

A Certificate of Indian Status issued by the Government of Canada;

A provincial health insurance card; or

A document or card with your signature and photograph from:

The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia;

Alberta Registries;

Saskatchewan Government Insurance;

The Department of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations;

The Department of Transportation and Public Works of the Province of Prince Edward Island;

Service New Brunswick;

The Department of Government Services and Lands of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador;

The Department of Transportation of the Northwest Territories; or

The Department of Community Government and Transportation of the Territory of Nunavut.

  • Service Ontario

List B

A drivers’ licence issued in Canada;

A Canadian passport;

A Certificate of Canadian Citizenship or Certification of Naturalization;

A Permanent Resident Card;

A birth certificate issued in Canada;

A Social Insurance Number (SIN) card issued by the Government of Canada;

An Old Age Security card issued by the Government of Canada;

A Certificate of Indian Status issued by the Government of Canada;

A provincial health insurance card; or

A document or card with your signature and photograph from:

The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia;

Alberta Registries;

Saskatchewan Government Insurance;

The Department of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations;

The Department of Transportation and Public Works of the Province of Prince Edward Island;

Service New Brunswick;

The Department of Government Services and Lands of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador;

The Department of Transportation of the Northwest Territories; or

The Department of Community Government and Transportation of the Territory of Nunavut.

Service Ontario

Ontario Health Card (OHIP)

You can apply for Ontario Health Card (OHIP) as soon as you have all the required documentation. However, there is a 3-month waiting period before you receive your card and your OHIP coverage begins.
To apply and get a Health Card (OHIP), you need to fill out an OHIP application and submit documents with your application.

Get an application form Ontario central form repository or get it from your local Service Ontario Office

Fill out the application.

Gather all the required documents, for a complete list of documents you may refer to Service Ontario website

You need to visit your local Service Ontario OHIP office and apply for OHIP in person

To apply for a Health Card; you need to present 1 document from each of the following 3 categories.

1- Proof of Citizenship

Canadian Citizens

Birth Certificate from a Canadian province or territory (issued under the Vital Statistics Act)

Canadian Certificate of Registration of Birth Abroad

Certified Statement of Live Birth from a Canadian province or territory

Certificate of Canadian Citizenship or Certificate of Naturalization (paper document or card, not commemorative issue)

Certificate of Indian Status (paper or plastic card)

Registered Indian Record (certified)

Valid Canadian Passport or a Canadian passport that has been expired for less than 5 years

Temporary Confirmation of Registration Document

Permanent Residents (Landed Immigrants)

Canadian Immigration Identification Card

Valid Permanent Resident Card or a Permanent Resident Card that has been expired for less than 5 years

Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM5292 or IMM5688)

Record of Landing (IMM1000)

Other Temporary Residents

Letter from Immigration and Refugee Board confirming Convention Refugee or Protected Person status

Protected Person Status document

Temporary Resident Permit (only some cases)

Work Permit (only some cases)

Written confirmation from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada that you are eligible to apply for permanent residence

Written confirmation from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada that you are eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship

Verification of status (IMM 5716 or IMM 5715)

2- Proof of Residency

Child Tax Benefit Statement

Employer record (pay stub or letter from employer on company letterhead)

Income tax assessment (most recent)

Insurance policy (home, tenant, auto or life)

Monthly mailed bank account statements for savings or chequing accounts (does not include receipts, bank books, letters or automated teller receipts)

Mortgage, rental or lease agreement

Ontario Motor Vehicle Permit (plate or vehicle portions)

Property tax bill

School, college or university report card or transcript

Statement of Direct Deposit for Ontario Works

Statement of Direct Deposit for Ontario Disability Support Program

Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid T4E

Statement of Old Age Security T4A (OAS) or Statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits T4A (P)

Statement of Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF), or Registered Home Ownership Savings Plan (RHOSP) from a financial institution (bank, trust company, credit union)

Utility bill received by mail (home telephone, cable TV, public utilities commission, hydro, gas, water)

Valid Ontario Driver’s Licence

Temporary Driver’s Licence (you must also show a photo license card with the same address)

Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Statement of Benefits T5007

Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contribution

Valid Ontario Photo Card

3- Support of Identity

Canadian Immigration Identification Card

Certificate of Canadian Citizenship (plastic card)

Certificate of Indian Status (paper or plastic card)

Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM5292, only if signature is displayed)

Credit card

Current employee ID card or document

Current professional association licence

Old Age Security card

Statement of Direct Deposit for Ontario Disability Support Program

Statement of Employment Insurance Benefits Paid T4E

Statement of Old Age Security T4A (OAS) or Statement of Canada Pension Plan Benefits T4A (P)

Statement of Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF), or Registered Home Ownership Savings Plan (RHOSP) from a financial institution (bank, trust company, credit union)

Utility bill received by mail (home telephone, cable TV, public utilities commission, hydro, gas, water)

Valid Ontario Driver’s Licence

Temporary Driver’s Licence (you must also show a photo license card with the same address)

Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Statement of Benefits T5007

Canada Pension Plan Statement of Contribution

Valid Ontario Photo Card

Some Notes on OHIP Coverage

OHIP pays for all or part of most basic medical and emergency services. However, it does not pay for some services such as cosmetic surgery (dental or physical), dental services or chiropractic services.
And it also pays for parts of the costs of the following services:

Some services from your doctor, and podiatrists

Physiotherapy treatments

Dental services in hospitals

Eye tests

Travel costs: if you live in northern Ontario and must travel long distances for specialty medical care, OHIP may pay some travel costs.

Although OHIP may cover some costs when you travel outside of Ontario or Canada; the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care recommends that you get private health insurance when you travel or to pay for services not covered by OHIP

Private health insurance is another option for those services that are not covered under OHIP, for newcomers and visitors to Canada and for those who are not eligible for OHIP

To find a private health insurance company, you can use “find insurance” tool from the OmbudService for life and Insurance website.

Insurance brokers are also an alternative to insurance companies. Brokers represent several different insurance companies and can tell you about your choices.

SIN number

Your Social Insurance Number is a nine-digit number that you’ll need to work in Canada. It’s similar to the PPS number in Ireland, the National Insurance Number in the UK, or the Tax File Number in Australia. If you’re in Canada on a temporary work permit, your SIN will begin with a ‘9’.

You can apply for a SIN at any Service Canada office, and if the queues are short, you should have it all sorted in about 30 minutes. Be sure to bring your work or study permit with you.

Our SIN Canada guide has more information on what you’ll need.

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613-897-3172

info@pandsettlement.ce

121 Inamill Crescent, Ottawa, ON K2T1G6

Call us : 613-897-3172

info@pandsettlement.ca

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© Copyright 2020 PAND Settlement Services

All Rights Reserved

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All Rights Reserved

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